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Characteristic V. alginolyticus V. parahaemolyticus V. cholerae non-O1/O139 V. vulnificus Other species
Total patients 23 (100) 20 (100) 10 (100) 7 (100) 7 (100)
Demographics
Age, y, median (SD) 50 (+26.7) 53 (+22.8) 69 (+19.7) 66 (+11.5) 40 (+24.8)
Sex
M 19 (83) 15 (75) 7 (70) 7 (100) 6 (86)
F 4 (17) 5 (25) 3 (30) 0 1 (14)
Underlying condition
Heart failure 8 (35) 6 (30) 5 (50) 4 (57) 1 (14)
Neoplasia 1 (4) 5 (25) 4 (40) 0 (0) 1 (14)
Diabetes 2 (9) 3 (15) 1 (10) 1 (14) 1 (14)
Kidney failure 2 (9) 1 (5) 1 (10) 0 3 (43)
Immune disease 2 (9) 2 (10) 1 (10) 0 2 (29)
Hemopathy 1 (4) 1 (5) 1 (10) 1 (14) 1 (14)
Liver disease 1 (4) 1 (5) 2 (20) 1 (14) 0
Alcohol use disorder 2 (9) 1 (5) 2 (20) 2 (29) 0
Preexisting wound 3 (13) 0 0 3 (43) 0
Digestive surgery 2 (9) 2 (10) 1 (10) 0 1 (14)
Time to symptom onset, d, median (SD) 2.4 (+2.0) 1.3 (+0.9) 3 (+4.4) 5.6 (+8.1) 1 (+0.0)
Infection type
Acute 14 (61) 19 (95) 10 (100) 7 (100) 5 (71)
Chronic 9 (39) 1 (5) 0 0 2 (29)
Outcome
Recovered 21 (91) 17 (85) 8 (80) 6 (86) 7 (100)
Died 2 (9) 3 (15) 2 (20) 1 (14) 0

Table 1. Clinical characteristics of patients with Vibrio infection, by species, Bay of Biscay, France, 2001–2019*

*Values are no. (%) except as indicated.

 

Antibiotic V. alginolyticus   V. parahaemolyticus   V. cholerae non-O1/O139   V. vulnificus
S I R S I R S I R S I R
Amoxicillin 1 0 15   1 6 7   2 2 3   5 0 0
Ticarcillin 5 0 10   2 2 9   5 0 1   5 0 0
First-generation cephalosporin 10 4 0   13 1 0   4 1 0   4 1 0

Table 2. Available drug-susceptibility test results for the main antibiotics used to treat Vibrio infections, by species, Bay of Biscay, France, 2001–2019*

*Data are no. of cases. I, intermediate; R, resistant; S, susceptible.

 

Characteristic No sepsis, n = 42   Septic shock, n = 13 p value
No. % (95% CI) No. % (95% CI)
Patient sex
M 35 83 (72–95)   10 77 (54–100) 0.685
F 7 17 (5–28)   3 23 (0.2–46)  
Underlying conditions
Heart failure 18 43 (28–58)   6 46 (19–73) Referent
Neoplasia 6 14 (4–25)   4 31 (6–56) 0.223
Diabetes 7 17 (5–28)   1 8 (0–22) 0.664
Kidney failure 5 12 (2–22)   2 15 (0–35) 0.664
Immune disease 5 12 (2–22)   2 15 (0–35) 0.664
Hemopathy 3 7 (0–15)   2 15 (0–35) 0.582
Liver disease 2 5 (0–11)   3 23 (0–46) 0.318
Alcohol use disorder 3 7 (0–15)   4 31 (6–56) 0.102
Preexisting wound 6 14 (4–25)   0 0 (0–0) 0.317
Digestive surgery 4 10 (1–18)   2 15 (0–35) 0.618
Species
V. alginolyticus 10 24 (11–37)   4 31 (6–56)  
V. parahaemolyticus 14 33 (19–48)   5 38 (12–65)  
V. cholerae non-O1/O139 8 19 (7–31)   2 15 (0–35)  
V. vulnificus 6 14 (4–25)   1 8 (0–22)  
Other Vibrio species 4 10 (1–18)   1 8 (0–22)
Outcome
Recovered 40 95 (89–100)   7 54 (27–81) 0.001
Died 2 5 (0–11)   6 46 (19–73)  

Table 3. Clinical characteristics and outcome of patients with and without septic shock after acute Vibrio infection, Bay of Biscay, France, 2001–2019*

*Median patient age ( + SD) was 60 ( + 21.4) for no sepsis and 61 ( + 15.3) for septic shock.

CME / ABIM MOC

Clinical and Epidemiologic Characteristics and Therapeutic Management of Patients With Vibrio Infections, Bay of Biscay, France, 2001–2019

  • Authors: Florence Hoefler, MD; Xavier Pouget-Abadie, MD; Mariam Roncato-Saberan, MD; Romain Lemarié, MD; Eve-Marie Takoudju, MD; François Raffi, MD; Stéphane Corvec, MD; Morgane Le Bras, MS; Charles Cazanave, MD; Philippe Lehours, MD; Thomas Guimard, MD; Caroline Allix-Béguec, PhD
  • CME / ABIM MOC Released: 11/18/2022
  • Valid for credit through: 11/18/2023
Start Activity

  • Credits Available

    Physicians - maximum of 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™

    ABIM Diplomates - maximum of 1.00 ABIM MOC points

    You Are Eligible For

    • Letter of Completion
    • ABIM MOC points

Target Audience and Goal Statement

This activity is intended for primary care physicians, infectious disease specialists, and other clinicians who treat and manage patients who may become infected with Vibrio spp.

The goal of this activity is to assess the epidemiology, microbiology, and prognosis of infection with Vibrio spp.

Upon completion of this activity, participants will:

  • Assess the epidemiology of infection with Vibrio spp. in the current study
  • Evaluate common anatomic sites of infection with Vibrio spp.
  • Distinguish the most common Vibrio spp. isolated in the current study
  • Analyze the treatment and outcomes of Vibrio infections


Disclosures

Medscape, LLC requires every individual in a position to control educational content to disclose all financial relationships with ineligible companies that have occurred within the past 24 months. Ineligible companies are organizations whose primary business is producing, marketing, selling, re-selling, or distributing healthcare products used by or on patients.

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Faculty

  • Florence Hoefler, MD

    Centre Hospitalier La Rochelle
    La Rochelle
    France
    Centre Hospitalier Troyes
    Troyes
    France

  • Xavier Pouget-Abadie, MD

    Centre Hospitalier La Rochelle
    La Rochelle
    France
     

  • Mariam Roncato-Saberan, MD

    Centre Hospitalier La Rochelle
    La Rochelle
    France
     

  • Romain Lemarié, MD

    Centre Hospitalier La Rochelle
    La Rochelle
    France
     

  • Eve-Marie Takoudju, MD

    Centre Hospitalier Départemental Vendée
    La Roche sur Yon
    France
     

  • François Raffi, MD

    Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Nantes
    Nantes
    France
     

  • Stéphane Corvec, MD

    Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Nantes
    Nantes
    France
     

  • Morgane Le Bras, MS

    Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Nantes
    Nantes
    France
    Centre Hospitalier d'Auxerre
    Auxerre
    France

  • Charles Cazanave, MD

    Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Bordeaux
    Bordeaux
    France
     

  • Philippe Lehours, MD

    Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Bordeaux
    Bordeaux
    France

  • Thomas Guimard, MD

    Centre Hospitalier Départemental Vendée
    La Roche sur Yon
    France
     

  • Caroline Allix-Béguec, PhD

    Centre Hospitalier La Rochelle
    La Rochelle
    France

CME Author

  • Charles P. Vega, MD

    Health Sciences Clinical Professor of Family Medicine
    University of California, Irvine School of Medicine
     

    Disclosures

    Charles P. Vega, MD, has the following relevant financial relationships:
    Consultant or advisor for: GlaxoSmithKline; Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research & Development, L.L.C.
     

Editor

  • Jude Rutledge, BA

    Copyeditor
    Emerging Infectious Diseases

Compliance Reviewer

  • Leigh Schmidt, MSN, RN, CNE, CHCP

    Associate Director, Accreditation and Compliance, Medscape, LLC

    Disclosures

    Leigh Schmidt, MSN, RN, CNE, CHCP, has no relevant financial relationships.


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    For Physicians

  • Medscape, LLC designates this Journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ . Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn up to 1.0 MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine's (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider's responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

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CME / ABIM MOC

Clinical and Epidemiologic Characteristics and Therapeutic Management of Patients With Vibrio Infections, Bay of Biscay, France, 2001–2019

Authors: Florence Hoefler, MD; Xavier Pouget-Abadie, MD; Mariam Roncato-Saberan, MD; Romain Lemarié, MD; Eve-Marie Takoudju, MD; François Raffi, MD; Stéphane Corvec, MD; Morgane Le Bras, MS; Charles Cazanave, MD; Philippe Lehours, MD; Thomas Guimard, MD; Caroline Allix-Béguec, PhDFaculty and Disclosures

CME / ABIM MOC Released: 11/18/2022

Valid for credit through: 11/18/2023

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References

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  2. Engel MF, Muijsken MA, Mooi-Kokenberg E, Kuijper EJ, van Westerloo DJ. Vibrio cholerae non-O1 bacteraemia: description of three cases in the Netherlands and a literature review. Euro Surveill. 2016;21:21. https://doi.org/ 10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2016.21.15.30197
  3. Jones MK, Oliver JD. Vibrio vulnificus: disease and pathogenesis. Infect Immun. 2009;77:1723–33. https://doi.org/10.1128/IAI.01046-08
  4. Jacobs Slifka KM, Newton AE, Mahon BE. Vibrio alginolyticus infections in the USA, 1988–2012. Epidemiol Infect. 2017; 145:1491–9. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0950268817000140
  5. Liao Y, Li Y, Wu S, Mou J, Xu Z, Cui R, et al. Risk factors for Vibrio parahaemolyticus infection in a southern coastal region of China. Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2015;12:881–6. https://doi.org/10.1089/fpd.2015.1988
  6. Dechet AM, Yu PA, Koram N, Painter J. Nonfoodborne Vibrio infections: an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States, 1997–2006. Clin Infect Dis. 2008;46:970–6. https://doi.org/10.1086/529148
  7. Morris JG Jr, Acheson D. Cholera and other types of vibriosis: a story of human pandemics and oysters on the half shell. Clin Infect Dis. 2003;37:272–80. https://doi.org/ 10.1086/375600
  8. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network: FoodNet 2011 surveillance report. 2012 [cited 2019 Dec 10]. https://www. cdc.gov/foodnet/pdfs/2011_annual_report_508c.pdf
  9. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Cholera and Other Vibrio Illness Surveillance (COVIS) annual summary, 2009. 2011 Nov [cited 2019 Dec 10]. https://www.cdc.gov/ nationalsurveillance/pdfs/cstevibrio2009.pdf
  10. Newton A, Kendall M, Vugia DJ, Henao OL, Mahon BE, Branch DE, et al. Increasing rates of vibriosis in the United States, 1996–2010: review of surveillance data from 2 systems. Clin Infect Dis. 2012;54(Suppl 5):S391–5. https://doi.org/10.1093/cid/cis243
  11. Iwamoto M, Ayers T, Mahon BE, Swerdlow DL. Epidemiology of seafood-associated infections in the United States. Clin Microbiol Rev. 2010;23:399–411. https://doi.org/ 10.1128/CMR.00059-09
  12. Scallan E, Hoekstra RM, Angulo FJ, Tauxe RV, Widdowson MA, Roy SL, et al. Foodborne illness acquired in the United States—major pathogens. Emerg Infect Dis. 2011;17:7–15. https://doi.org/10.3201/eid1701.P11101
  13. Weis KE, Hammond RM, Hutchinson R, Blackmore CGM. Vibrio illness in Florida, 1998–2007. Epidemiol Infect. 2011;139:591–8. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0950268810001354
  14. Baker-Austin C, Oliver JD, Alam M, Ali A, Waldor MK, Qadri F, et al. Vibrio spp. infections. Nat Rev Dis Primers. 2018;4:8. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41572-018-0005-8
  15. Kendall PA, Hillers VV, Medeiros LC. Food safety guidance for older adults. Clin Infect Dis. 2006;42:1298–304. https://doi.org/10.1086/503262
  16. Dechet AM, Yu PA, Koram N, Painter J. Nonfoodborne Vibrio infections: an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States, 1997–2006. Clin Infect Dis. 2008;46:970–6. https://doi.org/10.1086/529148
  17. Butt AA, Aldridge KE, Sanders CV. Infections related to the ingestion of seafood. Part I: viral and bacterial infections. Lancet Infect Dis. 2004;4:201–12. https://doi.org/10.1016/ S1473-3099(04)00969-7
  18. Baker-Austin C, Trinanes JA, Salmenlinna S, Löfdahl M, Siitonen A, Taylor NGH, et al. Heat wave-associated vibriosis, Sweden and Finland, 2014. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22:1216–20. https://doi.org/10.3201/eid2207.151996
  19. Vezzulli L, Grande C, Reid PC, Hélaouët P, Edwards M, Höfle MG, et al. Climate influence on Vibrio and associated human diseases during the past half-century in the coastal North Atlantic. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2016;113:E5062–71. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1609157113
  20. Baker-Austin C, Trinanes J, Gonzalez-Escalona N, Martinez-Urtaza J. Non-cholera vibrios: the microbial barometer of climate change. Trends Microbiol. 2017;25:76– 84. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tim.2016.09.008
  21. Deshayes S, Daurel C, Cattoir V, Parienti JJ, Quilici ML, de La Blanchardière A. Non-O1, non-O139 Vibrio cholerae bacteraemia: case report and literature review. Springerplus. 2015;4:575. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40064-015-1346-3
  22. Baker-Austin C, Stockley L, Rangdale R, Martinez-Urtaza J. Environmental occurrence and clinical impact of Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus: a European perspective. Environ Microbiol Rep. 2010;2:7–18. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1758-2229.2009.00096.x
  23. Rippey SR. Infectious diseases associated with molluscan shellfish consumption. Clin Microbiol Rev. 1994;7:419–25. https://doi.org/10.1128/CMR.7.4.419
  24. Wong KC, Brown AM, Luscombe GM, Wong SJ, Mendis K. Antibiotic use for Vibrio infections: important insights from surveillance data. BMC Infect Dis. 2015;15:226. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12879-015-0959-z
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