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CPD

How to Detect and Diagnose Typical and Atypical Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

  • Authors: Valerio Carelli, MD, PhD; Nancy J. Newman, MD
  • CPD Released: 10/6/2022
  • Valid for credit through: 10/6/2023
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  • Credits Available

    Non-US Physicians - maximum of 1.00 CPD

    Ophthamology - 1.0 CPD Point(s)

    You Are Eligible For

    • Letter of Completion

Target Audience and Goal Statement

This educational activity is intended for an international audience of non-US neurologists and ophthalmologists.

The goal of this activity is for learners to be better able to detect and diagnose LHON, with a focus on differential diagnosis and recognizing classic as well as atypical presentations and associated management strategies.

Upon completion of this activity, participants will:

  • Have increased knowledge regarding the
    • LHON treatment strategies, including gene therapy
  • Have greater competence related to
    • Detecting LHON
    • Diagnosing LHON


Disclosures

WebMD Global requires every individual in a position to control educational content to disclose all financial relationships with ineligible companies that have occurred within the past 24 months. Ineligible companies are organizations whose primary business is producing, marketing, selling, re-selling, or distributing healthcare products used by or on patients.

All relevant financial relationships for anyone with the ability to control the content of this educational activity are listed below and have been mitigated. Others involved in the planning of this activity have no relevant financial relationships with ineligible companies.


Faculty

  • Valerio Carelli, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology
    University of Bologna
    Bologna, Italy

    Disclosures

    Valerio Carelli, MD, PhD, has no relevant financial relationships.

  • Nancy J. Newman, MD

    Leodelle Jolley Chair in Ophthalmology
    Professor of Ophthalmology and Neurology
    Instructor in Neurological Surgery
    Director of Neuro-Ophthalmology
    Emory University School of Medicine
    Atlanta, Georgia, United States

    Disclosures

    The opinions expressed are those of Dr Newman and do not necessarily reflect the views of Emory University or Emory Healthcare. Dr Newman's participation in this activity does not constitute or imply endorsement by Emory University or Emory Healthcare.
    Nancy J. Newman, MD, has the following relevant financial relationships:
    Consultant or advisor for: Chiesi; GenSight
    Research funding from: Chiesi; GenSight

Editors

  • Maya Khalaf, MSc

    Associate Medical Education Director, WebMD, LLC 

    Disclosures

    Maya Khalaf, MSc, has no relevant financial relationships. 

  • Jenny Engelmoer, PhD

    Medical Writer, Sula Communications, the Netherlands

    Disclosures

    Jenny Engelmoer, PhD, has no relevant financial relationships.

Compliance Reviewer

  • Stephanie Corder, ND, RN, CHCP

    Associate Director, Accreditation and Compliance

    Disclosures

    Stephanie Corder, ND, RN, CHCP, has no relevant financial relationships.

Peer Reviewer

This activity has been peer reviewed and the reviewer has no relevant financial relationships. 


Accreditation Statements

    For Physicians

  • The Faculty of Pharmaceutical Medicine of the Royal Colleges of Physicians of the United Kingdom (FPM) has reviewed and approved the content of this educational activity and allocated it 1.0 continuing professional development credits (CPD).

    Approved by The Royal College of Ophthalmologists for 1.0 CPD point. 

    Contact WebMD Global

For questions regarding the content of this activity, contact the accredited provider for this CME/CE activity noted above. For technical assistance, contact [email protected]


Instructions for Participation and Credit

There are no fees for participating in or receiving credit for this online educational activity. For information about your eligibility to claim credit, please consult your professional licensing board.

This activity is designed to be completed within the time designated on the title page; physicians should claim only those credits that reflect the time actually spent participating in the activity. To successfully earn credit, participants must complete the activity online during the credit eligibility period that is noted on the title page.

Follow these steps to claim a credit certificate for completing this activity:

  1. Read the information provided on the title page regarding the target audience, learning objectives, and author disclosures, read and study the activity content and then complete the post-test questions. If you earn a passing score on the post-test and we have determined based on your registration profile that you may be eligible to claim CPD credit for completing this activity, we will issue you a CPD credit certificate.
  2. Once your CPD credit certificate has been issued, you may view and print the certificate from your CME/CE Tracker. CPD credits will be tallied in your CME/CE Tracker and archived for 6 years; at any point within this time period you can print out the tally as well as the certificates by accessing "Edit Your Profile" at the top of the Medscape Education homepage.

We encourage you to complete an Activity Evaluation to provide feedback for future programming.

You may now view or print the certificate from your CME/CE Tracker. You may print the certificate but you cannot alter it. Credits will be tallied in your CME/CE Tracker and archived for 6 years; at any point within this time period you can print out the tally as well as the certificates by accessing "Edit Your Profile" at the top of your Medscape homepage.

*The credit that you receive is based on your user profile.

CPD

How to Detect and Diagnose Typical and Atypical Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

Authors: Valerio Carelli, MD, PhD; Nancy J. Newman, MDFaculty and Disclosures

CPD Released: 10/6/2022

Valid for credit through: 10/6/2023

processing....

The following cases are modeled on the interactive grand rounds approach. The questions within the activity are designed to test your current knowledge. After each question, you will be able to see whether you answered correctly and read evidence-based information that supports the most appropriate answer choice. The questions are designed to challenge you; you will not be penalized for answering the questions incorrectly. At the end of the activity, there will be a short post-test assessment based on the material presented.

CLINICAL CASE 1: Patient History

A 23-year-old White male university student presented with subacute vision loss in the left eye and reduced color vision in the right eye after a party at a friend's house. During the evening he accidentally walked into an open kitchen cupboard door while intoxicated due to excess alcohol drinking and has a small laceration to his right forehead. No altered consciousness or headaches were reported, and the patient has not noted any pain in his eyes. He is a moderate cigarette smoker with the occasional use of cannabis socially. He has no current medical conditions or medication, and he wears prescriptive lenses (left eye: -3.50; right eye: -3.00) with no astigmatism corrections.

Case 1: Clinical Exam

Visual assessments showed a central scotoma in the left eye and visual acuity of 20/200. Color vision was impaired in both eyes. A full ophthalmologic exam was performed including assessment of visual acuity, visual field, color vision, contrast sensitivity, fundoscopy (Figures 1 and 2), and optical coherence tomography (OCT) of both eyes.

Figure 1. Fundoscopy Images of the Left and Right Eyes

Images courtesy of Valerio Carelli, MD.

Figure 2. Visual Field Evaluation of the Left and Right Eyes

Images courtesy of Valerio Carelli, MD.
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