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CME / ABIM MOC

Shewanella spp. Bloodstream Infections in Queensland, Australia

  • Authors: Kevin B. Laupland, PhD; Adam G. Stewart, MBBS; Felicity Edwards, BHlthSc; David L. Paterson, MBBS; Sonali Coulter, PhD; Claire Heney, MBBCh; Narelle George, MSc; Patrick Harris, PhD
  • CME / ABIM MOC Released: 3/17/2022
  • Valid for credit through: 3/17/2023
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  • Credits Available

    Physicians - maximum of 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™

    ABIM Diplomates - maximum of 1.00 ABIM MOC points

    You Are Eligible For

    • Letter of Completion
    • ABIM MOC points

Target Audience and Goal Statement

This activity is intended for infectious disease clinicians, internists, intensivists, geriatricians, public health officials, and other clinicians who treat and manage patients with or at risk for Shewanella spp. bloodstream infections.

The goal of this activity is to describe the incidence of and risk factors for development of Shewanella spp. bloodstream infections, based on findings of a population-based surveillance study in Queensland, Australia, during 2000-2019.

Upon completion of this activity, participants will:

  • Assess the incidence and epidemiology of Shewanella species bloodstream infections, based on findings of a population-based surveillance study in Queensland, Australia, during 2000-2019
  • Evaluate the risk factors for development of Shewanella species bloodstream infections and clinical course, based on findings of a population-based surveillance study in Queensland, Australia, during 2000-2019
  • Determine the clinical and public health implications of the incidence and epidemiology of and risk factors for development of Shewanella spp. bloodstream infections, based on findings of a population-based surveillance study in Queensland, Australia, during 2000-2019


Disclosures

Medscape, LLC requires every individual in a position to control educational content to disclose all financial relationships with ineligible companies that have occurred within the past 24 months. Ineligible companies are organizations whose primary business is producing, marketing, selling, re-selling, or distributing healthcare products used by or on patients.

All relevant financial relationships for anyone with the ability to control the content of this educational activity are listed below and have been mitigated according to Medscape policies. Others involved in the planning of this activity have no relevant financial relationships.


Authors

  • Kevin B. Laupland, PhD

    Department of Intensive Care Services, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

  • Adam G. Stewart, MBBS

    University of Queensland, Faculty of Medicine, UQ Center for Clinical Research, Brisbane, Australia; Infectious Diseases Unit, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, Australia

  • Felicity Edwards, BHlthSc

    Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

  • David L. Paterson, MBBS

    University of Queensland, Faculty of Medicine, UQ Center for Clinical Research, Brisbane, Australia; Infectious Diseases Unit, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, Australia

  • Sonali Coulter, PhD

    Medication Services Queensland, Chief Medical Officer and Health Regulation Branch, Brisbane, Australia

  • Claire Heney, MBBCh

    Department of Microbiology, Pathology Queensland, Brisbane, Australia

  • Narelle George, MSc

    Department of Microbiology, Pathology Queensland, Brisbane, Australia

  • Patrick Harris, PhD

    University of Queensland, Faculty of Medicine, UQ Center for Clinical Research, Brisbane, Australia; Department of Microbiology, Pathology Queensland, Brisbane, Australia

CME Author

  • Laurie Barclay, MD

    Freelance writer and reviewer
    Medscape, LLC

    Disclosures

    Disclosure: Laurie Barclay, MD, has disclosed the following relevant financial relationships:
    Stock, stock options, or bonds: AbbVie (former)

Editor

  • Thomas J. Gryczan, MS

    Copyeditor 
    Emerging Infectious Diseases

    Disclosures

    Disclosure: Thomas J. Gryczan, MS, has disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

CME Reviewer

  • Leigh A. Schmidt, MSN, RN, CMSRN, CNE, CHCP

    Associate Director, Accreditation and Compliance
    Medscape, LLC

    Disclosures

    Disclosure: Leigh A. Schmidt, MSN, RN, CMSRN, CNE, CHCP, has disclosed no relevant financial relationships.


Accreditation Statements



In support of improving patient care, this activity has been planned and implemented by Medscape, LLC and Emerging Infectious Diseases. Medscape, LLC is jointly accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), and the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), to provide continuing education for the healthcare team.

    For Physicians

  • Medscape, LLC designates this Journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ . Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn up to 1.0 MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine's (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider's responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

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For questions regarding the content of this activity, contact the accredited provider for this CME/CE activity noted above. For technical assistance, contact [email protected]


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You may now view or print the certificate from your CME/CE Tracker. You may print the certificate, but you cannot alter it. Credits will be tallied in your CME/CE Tracker and archived for 6 years; at any point within this time period, you can print out the tally as well as the certificates from the CME/CE Tracker.

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CME / ABIM MOC

Shewanella spp. Bloodstream Infections in Queensland, Australia

Authors: Kevin B. Laupland, PhD; Adam G. Stewart, MBBS; Felicity Edwards, BHlthSc; David L. Paterson, MBBS; Sonali Coulter, PhD; Claire Heney, MBBCh; Narelle George, MSc; Patrick Harris, PhDFaculty and Disclosures

CME / ABIM MOC Released: 3/17/2022

Valid for credit through: 3/17/2023

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Note: It is the policy of Medscape Education to avoid the mention of brand names or specific manufacturers in accredited educational activities. However, product names related to microbial identification platforms are provided in this activity in an effort to clearly depict the research methodology. The use of manufacturer names should not be viewed as an endorsement of any specific product or manufacturer.

Abstract and Introduction

Abstract

The epidemiology of bloodstream infections caused by Shewanella spp. is not well defined. Our objective was to define the incidence and determinants of Shewanella spp. bloodstream infections by using population-based surveillance in Queensland, Australia during 2000‒2019. The incidence was 1.0 cases/1 million persons annually and was highest during summer and in the tropical Torres and Cape region. Older persons and male patients were at highest risk. At least 1 concurrent condition was documented in 75% of case-patients, and 30-day all cause case-fatality rate was 15%. Aging populations in warm climates might expect an increasing burden of these infections.

Introduction

Shewanella spp., most commonly S. algae and S. putrefaciens, are infrequent but occasionally severe causes of human infection associated with exposure to warm marine environments[1,2]. Cases of otogenic and skin and soft tissue infections caused by S. (Pseudomonas) putrefaciens were described in the 1960s, and case series of bacteremic infections were reported in subsequent decades[3,4]. Vignier et al. reported 16 cases of Shewanella spp. infection that occurred in Martinique during 1997–2012 and identified an additional 239 cases in review of the published literature during 1973–2011[5]. That study observed that otogenic, skin and soft tissue, abdominal/biliary tract, and respiratory tract foci of infection were most common, and that 71 (28%) cases were bacteremic[5]. Shewanella spp. are frequently coisolated with other organisms, most notably Enterobacterales and Aeromonas and Vibrio spp., and occasionally might develop major antimicrobial drug resistance[2,5,6].

As a result of their rarity, the epidemiology of Shewanella spp. bloodstream infections (BSIs) is poorly defined. The existing body of literature is limited to case reports and small series. In addition, as a result of developments in genomic and phenotypic testing, it has been recognized that before the current millennium many reports of S. putrefaciens infection might have been actually caused by S. algae[7]. The objective of this study was to determine the contemporary incidence of and risk factors for development of Shewanella spp. BSIs in the population of Queensland, Australia.