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CME

Sexual History: Skills for HIV Assessment and Prevention

  • Authors: Donna E. Sweet, MD, MACP
  • CME Released: 9/27/2016; Reviewed and Renewed: 9/28/2017
  • THIS ACTIVITY HAS EXPIRED
  • Valid for credit through: 9/28/2018
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Target Audience and Goal Statement

This activity is intended for primary care physicians, ID/HIV specialists, and public health & preventive medicine specialists.

The goal of this activity is to: increase the knowledge of primary care physicians on taking a sexual history and how it can prevent HIV infection.

Upon completion of this activity, participants will have increased knowledge regarding:

    1. Effective sexual history taking
    2. Risk factors for acquiring HIV infection
    3. HIV testing in the primary care setting

 


Disclosures

As an organization accredited by the ACCME, Medscape, LLC, requires everyone who is in a position to control the content of an education activity to disclose all relevant financial relationships with any commercial interest. The ACCME defines "relevant financial relationships" as financial relationships in any amount, occurring within the past 12 months, including financial relationships of a spouse or life partner, that could create a conflict of interest.

Medscape, LLC, encourages Authors to identify investigational products or off-label uses of products regulated by the US Food and Drug Administration, at first mention and where appropriate in the content.


Faculty

  • Donna E. Sweet, MD, MACP

    Professor; Director Ryan White Programs, The University of Kansas School of Medicine, Wichita, Kansas

    Disclosures

    Disclosure: Donna Sweet, MD, MACP, has disclosed the following relevant financial relationships:
    Served as an advisor or consultant for: Pfizer Inc.
    Served as a speaker or a member of a speakers bureau for: AbbVie Inc.; Bristol-Myers Squibb Company; Gilead Sciences, Inc.; Janssen Pharmaceuticals;
    Received grants for clinical research from: Merck & Co., Inc.

    Dr Sweet does not intend to discuss off-label uses of drugs, mechanical devices, biologics, or diagnostics approved by the FDA for use in the United States.

    Dr Sweet does not intend to discuss investigational drugs, mechanical devices, biologics, or diagnostics not approved by the FDA for use in the United States.

Editor(s)

  • Charles Howe, PharmD

    Scientific Director, Medscape, LLC

    Disclosures

    Disclosure: Charles Howe, PharmD, has disclosed the following relevant financial relationships:
    Owns stock from GlaxoSmithKline

  • Susan L. Smith, MN, PhD

    Lead Scientific Director, Medscape, LLC

    Disclosures

    Disclosure: Susan L. Smith, MN, PhD, has disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

CME Reviewer

  • Robert Morris, PharmD

    Associate CME Clinical Director, Medscape, LLC

    Disclosures

    Disclosure: Robert Morris, PharmD, has disclosed no relevant financial relationships.


Accreditation Statements


Medscape, LLC is accredited by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), and the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), to provide continuing education for the healthcare team.

    For Physicians

  • Medscape, LLC designates this enduring material for a maximum of 0.50 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ . Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    Medscape, LLC staff have disclosed that they have no relevant financial relationships.

    Contact This Provider

For questions regarding the content of this activity, contact the accredited provider for this CME/CE activity noted above. For technical assistance, contact [email protected]


Instructions for Participation and Credit

There are no fees for participating in or receiving credit for this online educational activity. For information on applicability and acceptance of continuing education credit for this activity, please consult your professional licensing board. This activity is designed to be completed within the time designated on the title page; physicians should claim only those credits that reflect the time actually spent in the activity. To successfully earn credit, participants must complete the activity online during the valid credit period that is noted on the title page. To receive AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™, you must receive a minimum score of 75% on the post-test. Follow these steps to earn CME/CE credit*:

  1. Read the target audience, learning objectives, and author disclosures.
  2. Study the educational content online or printed out.
  3. Online, choose the best answer to each test question. To receive a certificate, you must receive a passing score as designated at the top of the test. We encourage you to complete the Activity Evaluation to provide feedback for future programming.

You may now view or print the certificate from your CME/CE Tracker. You may print the certificate but you cannot alter it. Credits will be tallied in your CME/CE Tracker and archived for 6 years; at any point within this time period you can print out the tally as well as the certificates from the CME/CE Tracker. *The credit that you receive is based on your user profile.

CME

Sexual History: Skills for HIV Assessment and Prevention

Authors: Donna E. Sweet, MD, MACPFaculty and Disclosures
THIS ACTIVITY HAS EXPIRED

CME Released: 9/27/2016; Reviewed and Renewed: 9/28/2017

Valid for credit through: 9/28/2018

processing....

References

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Diagnosis of HIV infection in the United States and dependent areas, 2014. HIV Surveillance Report. 2014;26:19-31. http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/pdf/library/reports/surveillance/cdc-hiv-surveillance-report-us.pdf. Accessed September 16, 2016.
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Monitoring selected national HIV prevention and care objectives by using HIV surveillance data United States and 6 dependent areas. HIV Surveillance Supplemental Report. 2016;21:48. https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/pdf/library/reports/surveillance/cdc-hiv-surveillance-supplemental-report-vol-21-4.pdf. Accessed September 16, 2016.
  3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A guide to taking a sexual history. http://www.cdc.gov/std/treatment/sexualhistory.pdf. Accessed September 16, 2016.
  4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. HIV prevention through early detection and treatment of other sexually transmitted diseases - United States. MMWR Recomm Rep. 1998;47:1-24.
  5. Fleming DT, Wasserheit JN. From epidemiological synergy to public health policy and practice: The contribution of other sexually transmitted diseases to sexual transmission of HIV infection. Sex Transm Infect. 1999;75:3-17.
  6. Ward H, Rönn M. The contribution of STIs to the sexual transmission of HIV. Curr Opin HIV AIDS. 2010;5:305-310.
  7. National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention. 9 in 10 new US HIV infections come from people not receiving HIV care. https://aidsinfo.nih.gov/news/1540/from-cdc-9-in-10-new-us-hiv-infections-come-from-people-not-receiving-hiv-care. Accessed September 16, 2016.
  8. Branson BM, Handsfield HH, Lampe MA, et al. Revised recommendations for HIV testing of adults, adolescents, and pregnant women in health-care settings. Morb Mort Weekly Rep. 2006;55:1-17.
  9. Moyer VA. Screening for HIV: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. Ann Intern Med. 2013;159:51-60.
  10. Walensky RP, Freedburg KA, Weinstein MC, et al. Cost-effectiveness of HIV testing and treatment in the United States. Clin Infect Dis. 2007;45:S248-S254.
  11. Sanders GD, Bayoumi AM, Sundaram V, et al. Cost-effectiveness of screening for HIV in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy. N Engl J Med. 2005;352:570-585.
  12. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. HIV cost effectiveness. http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/programresources/guidance/costeffectiveness/index.html. Accessed September 16, 2016.
  13. Hutchinson AB, Farnham PG, Sansom SL, et al. Cost-effectiveness of frequent HIV testing of high-risk populations in the United States. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2016;71:323-330.
  14. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Preexposure prophylaxis for the prevention of HIV infection in the United States – 2014. A clinical practice guideline: page 11. https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/pdf/prepguidelines2014.pdf. Accessed September 16, 2016.
  15. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Laboratory Testing for the Diagnosis of HIV Infection: Updated Recommendations. http://stacks.cdc.gov/view/cdc/23447. Accessed September 16, 2016.
  16. LeFevre ML; U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Screening for chlamydia and gonorrhea: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. Ann Intern Med. 2014;161:902-910.
  17. Cohen MS, Chen YQ, McCauley M, et al. Antiretroviral therapy for the prevention of HIV-1 transmission. N Engl J Med. 2016;375:830-839.
  18. Department of Health and Human Services. FDA-Approved HIV Medicines. https://aidsinfo.nih.gov/education-materials/fact-sheets/21/58/fda-approved-hiv-medicines#. Accessed September 16, 2016.
  19. Samji H, Cescon A, Hogg RS, et al. Closing the gap: increases in life expectancy among treated HIV-positive individuals in the United States and Canada. PLoS ONE. 2013;8:e81355.
  20. Stein MD, Crystal S, Cunningham WE, et al. Delays in seeking HIV care due to competing caregiver responsibilities. Am J Public Health.2000;90:1138-1140
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