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CME/CE

A Case for Documenting Occupational History in the Medical Record

  • Authors: Sara E. Luckhaupt, MD, MPH; Geoffrey M. Calvert, MD, MPH
  • CME/CE Released: 1/29/2010
  • THIS ACTIVITY HAS EXPIRED
  • Valid for credit through: 1/29/2011
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Target Audience and Goal Statement

This activity is intended for physicians and other clinicians, especially those in primary care.

The goal of this activity is to describe the importance of documenting a patient's occupational history in the medical record from 3 perspectives: prevention and treatment of individual cases of injury or illness; identification of occupational outbreaks/clusters; and surveillance, epidemiology, and research. In addition, clinicians will learn when and how to refer patients with work-related injuries or illnesses for possible workers' compensation.

Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the importance of documenting a patient's occupational history in the medical record from 3 perspectives: prevention and treatment of individual cases of injury or illness; identification of occupational outbreaks/clusters; and surveillance, epidemiology, and research
  2. List 3 screening questions that can be used to detect whether a patient's complaint might be work related
  3. Recognize when and how to refer patients with work-related injuries or illnesses for possible workers' compensation
  4. Identify resources that can help clinicians recognize and manage occupational illnesses and injuries


Disclosures

As an organization accredited by the ACCME, Medscape, LLC, requires everyone who is in a position to control the content of an education activity to disclose all relevant financial relationships with any commercial interest. The ACCME defines "relevant financial relationships" as financial relationships in any amount, occurring within the past 12 months, including financial relationships of a spouse or life partner, that could create a conflict of interest.

Medscape, LLC, encourages Authors to identify investigational products or off-label uses of products regulated by the US Food and Drug Administration, at first mention and where appropriate in the content.


Author(s)

  • Sara E. Luckhaupt, MD, MPH

    Medical Officer, Division of Surveillance, Hazard Evaluations, and Field Studies, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Cincinnati, Ohio

    Disclosures

    Disclosure: Sara E. Luckhaupt, MD, MPH, has disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

  • Geoffrey M. Calvert, MD, MPH

    Team Leader, State-Based Surveillance, Division of Surveillance, Hazard Evaluations, and Field Studies, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Cincinnati, Ohio

    Disclosures

    Disclosure: Geoffrey M. Calvert, MD, MPH, has disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

Editor(s)

  • Janet Kim, MPH

    Site Editor, Medscape, LLC

    Disclosures

    Disclosure: Janet Kim, MPH, has disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

  • Susan Yox, RN, EdD

    Director, Editorial Content, Medscape, LLC

    Disclosures

    Disclosure: Susan Yox, RN, EdD, has disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

  • Joanna M. Pangilinan, PharmD, BCOP

    Pharmacist, Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan

    Disclosures

    Disclosure: Joanna M. Pangilinan, PharmD, has disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

Nurse Planner

  • Susan Yox, RN, EdD

    Director, Editorial Content, Medscape, LLC

    Disclosures

    Disclosure: Susan Yox, RN, EdD, has disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

CME Reviewer(s)

  • Laurie E. Scudder, MS, NP

    Accreditation Coordinator, Continuing Professional Education Department, Medscape, LLC; Clinical Assistant Professor, School of Nursing and Allied Health, George Washington University, Washington, DC; Nurse Practitioner, School-Based Health Centers, Baltimore City Public Schools, Baltimore, Maryland

    Disclosures

    Disclosure: Laurie E. Scudder, MS, NP, has disclosed no relevant financial relationships.


Accreditation Statements

    For Physicians

  • Medscape, LLC is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    Medscape, LLC designates this educational activity for a maximum of 0.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ . Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    Medscape, LLC staff have disclosed that they have no relevant financial relationships.

    Contact This Provider

    For Nurses

  • Medscape, LLC is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation.

    Awarded 0.5 contact hour(s) of continuing nursing education for RNs and APNs; none of these credits is in the area of pharmacology.

    Accreditation of this program does not imply endorsement by either Medscape, LLC or ANCC.

    Contact This Provider

For questions regarding the content of this activity, contact the accredited provider for this CME/CE activity noted above. For technical assistance, contact [email protected]


Instructions for Participation and Credit

There are no fees for participating in or receiving credit for this online educational activity. For information on applicability and acceptance of continuing education credit for this activity, please consult your professional licensing board.

This activity is designed to be completed within the time designated on the title page; physicians should claim only those credits that reflect the time actually spent in the activity. To successfully earn credit, participants must complete the activity online during the valid credit period that is noted on the title page.

Follow these steps to earn CME/CE credit*:

  1. Read the target audience, learning objectives, and author disclosures.
  2. Study the educational content online or printed out.
  3. Online, choose the best answer to each test question. To receive a certificate, you must receive a passing score as designated at the top of the test. MedscapeCME encourages you to complete the Activity Evaluation to provide feedback for future programming.

You may now view or print the certificate from your CME/CE Tracker. You may print the certificate but you cannot alter it. Credits will be tallied in your CME/CE Tracker and archived for 6 years; at any point within this time period you can print out the tally as well as the certificates by accessing "Edit Your Profile" at the top of your Medscape homepage.

*The credit that you receive is based on your user profile.

CME/CE

A Case for Documenting Occupational History in the Medical Record

Authors: Sara E. Luckhaupt, MD, MPH; Geoffrey M. Calvert, MD, MPHFaculty and Disclosures
THIS ACTIVITY HAS EXPIRED

CME/CE Released: 1/29/2010

Valid for credit through: 1/29/2011

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Introduction

Occupational hazards have been recognized at least since the time of Socrates (c. 469 BC-399 BC), but it was not until around 1700 AD that Bernardino Ramazzini, often dubbed "the Father of Occupational Medicine," made a "striking addition to the art of diagnosis" by suggesting that clinicians ask patients about their occupations.[1]

Despite the passage of the Occupational Safety and Health Act in 1970, work-related injuries and illnesses are still common in the United States. According to recent reviews,[2,3] of the estimated 139 million working Americans:

  • 15 die from a work-related injury every day;
  • About 3.7 million cases of nonfatal injury or illness occurred in 2008;
  • Nonfatal injury or illness occurred in about 3.9 per 100 full-time workers; and
  • Injuries account for about 95% of cases of work-related illness or injury.

This article describes the importance of documenting a patient's occupational history in the medical record from 3 perspectives: prevention and treatment of individual cases of injury or illness; identification of occupational outbreaks/clusters; and surveillance, epidemiology, and research. In addition, clinicians will learn when and how to refer patients with work-related injuries or illnesses for possible workers' compensation.